what I meant was…

Source: TNP - Gary Goh

There’s a profile of Chelsea and I in one of the local newspapers today, The New Paper – (read here) which we were asked to do to help illustrate that it is possible to be positive and to embrace life even if your child has a life threatening condition. The catalyst for the piece was the very sad death of a 5 year old Singaporean girl who had been battling cancer for the last two years.

 During the interview I made a comment that there were times when it would be easier if Chelsea only had cancer,  in response to a question about what was the most challenging thing for me.

I went on to explain that with cancer the medical profession has had great successes treating childhood cancers and the access to extensive global and local experience and research ensure that there are timelines and scenarios that doctors can give that will tell you the good, the bad and the ugly scenario that you may face. Knowing when and what to expect  combined with the real chance of a full recovery for many, would, for me, be preferable to not knowing. 

To be clear I do not wish my child had cancer, and I do not think that any child suffering from cancer, or their family,  has it easy or easier than we do.

I just meant that I wish I could have access to the same level of  information and understanding and I wish that there was a chance of full recovery or survival and a return to”normal” (sic)  life for her. 

Doesn’t read like that though so I better get used to saying “what I meant was” and be glad that as  a friend, Winston commented at mass this morning  “the good thing is not many people really read that paper!” 

Which is a shame because I thought Bryna Sim  the journalist did a good job and the photos that Gary Goh  took were fabulous – and I am grateful to them for the kind things they said and for telling Chelsea’s story. 

Have a great Sunday

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About Sandra F

Sandra Fairclough has more than 20 years international experience as a senior executive & vice president of a major Fortune 100 media company. She is a working mother who balances her life as a management consultant, speaker and coach with her other roles as a wife and mother to 3 amazing and extraordinary children, one of whom Chelsea is a C1/C2 tracheostomy ventilated quadriplegic.
This entry was posted in Disability, Family, News, Singapore, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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